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30

Oct
2014

No Comments

In Life

By Daniel Kao

The Narrative Fallacy – Why Looking Back can be Deceptive

On 30, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In Life | By Daniel Kao

Humans usually remember things best when told as a story.

Stories that are emotional are engaging and memorable, while an overwhelming list of facts generally is not. And because of this simple fact of human psychology, we find ourselves drawn to stories of our favorite heroes, and attempting to analyze their lives in order to validate what we do.

The narrative fallacy, as popularized by Nassim Taleb in The Black Swan, states that humans have a tendency to oversimplify and explain past events from the bias of their worldview.

Any past event can be explained in an extremely large variety of different ways, and the explanations can be unbelievably far apart. In fact, how many times have you heard two people make two conflicting points from the exact same story?

It’s a common thing to say that the dots always connect looking backwards, but more often than not, they connect because we find some way of explaining the dots so that it supports our hypothesis.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with telling stories. Stories are a great way to inspire and emotionally connect with others, but it’s also easy to get blind-sighted when we take the story-teller’s interpretation as gospel.

I’ll be the first to say that the dots don’t always connect looking backwards, and I’m completely okay with that.

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Reaching Your Peak and Maintaining Vision

On 22, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In Productivity | By Daniel Kao

In the past, I’ve written about how to get through unproductive slumps in your days, and how to maintain vision over many days.

Today I’m going to talk about the opposite end of the spectrum: What happens after you achieve something so great and are unable to top it?

Imagine being an astronaut who was part of the Apollo program in the 1960s. After preparing years for your great space expedition, it finally happens. You take a trip to the moon, see the famous view of the earth as a small blue marble with your own eyes, collect some samples form the surface of the moon, and then return home to earth.

How do you reintegrate back into what life was before after such an experience? It’s a general challenge for people who reach the top of their game to maintain vision and continue on. We find that many athletes, astronauts, entrepreneurs, actors, and otherwise aren’t always satisfied after their accomplishments. They’ve accomplished their impossible life dream, but something doesn’t sit right. Some of them find themselves depressed, lost, and unfulfilled.

You may not have gone to the moon or sold a company for millions of dollars, but I’ve found that to the extent you’ve set your dreams is the extent that achieving dreams will produce this effect.

It’s easy to think that you’ll be happy after you achieve x or y, and then spend years working to get there, only to find that reaching that point leaves you still unsatisfied.

The point isn’t to find satisfaction in the achievement of your dreams, but to be satisfied as you live on a daily basis.

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Uncovering Secrets – Mindsets Toward Building the Future

On 17, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In Entrepreneurship | By Daniel Kao

In his most recent book, Peter Thiel talks about secrets. Secrets in the sense of truths that have not yet been discovered that will help the human condition. These are secrets that, once discovered, will give a lucky researcher or entrepreneur the ability to capitalize on their secret.

It’s easy to believe that there are no more secrets in the world, that what we see and experience on a daily basis is about as good as it gets. But as Moore’s law (that processing power for the same price point doubles every 18 months) suggests, technology, and innovation as a result, will only increase at an exponential rate.

People who believe that there are no more secrets to be discovered find themselves in a fixed perspective when it comes to the world. They do not see how things can get better, and so they don’t try to improve them. Most people fall into this category, as they simply do as their told and build their life in the constructs of today and not for what the future will be.

Next, you find people who believe that society is not a static construct, and that innovation is happening incrementally. These people will generally look at the past, and linearly extrapolate what has happened in the past into what will happen in the future. These people usually will think in terms of how much improvement has happened between yesterday and today, and predict that tomorrow will increase the same amount.

Last, and most uncommon, you find the people who seem to be completely out of their mind, but these are the people who truly understand exponential thinking and looking to the future. These people understand that the future will be full of things that are completely unimaginable in the present, and that preparing for the future is not merely adding previous rates of change. These are the people that will dig for the secrets, and test what they hypothesize.

Think about this: how many people today sit around discussing the billion dollar ideas of the present, and dream about how they wish that they were the ones to have come up with these ideas? How many people look back at the markets 20 years ago and introspect on how easy it would have been to start a company at that time? Unfortunately, most people do this.

They do this in a way where they completely ignore the present, and the mass amount of secrets still yet to be uncovered. I bet that in 20 years people will be looking back at the 2010s as such an easy time to start companies and build their ideas.

Here’s a secret: there are still infinite amounts of secrets to uncover.

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13

Oct
2014

No Comments

In Podcast

By Daniel Kao

BrightEyes Podcast Episode 1 – Tiffany Stone

On 13, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In Podcast | By Daniel Kao

I’m extremely excited to announce something that I have been working on for the past couple of weeks.

Ever since I started diving into the world of podcasts about a year ago, I’ve wondered what it would be like to host my own.

As a team member of BrightEyes, a study tour program that provides undergraduates at UCSD with the opportunity to experience an industry firsthand, I’ve decided to leverage the BrightEyes platform for my podcast. In this episode, I have the privilege of interviewing one of my mentors and the founder of BrightEyes herself.

Tiffany is the founder of BrightEyes, Marketing Coordinator at Sols, UCSD Alumni, among many other things.

The BrightEyes Podcast is the official podcast for BrightEyes. Tune in every month for a new podcast! The podcast features various individuals part of the BrightEyes community. BrightEyes team member, Daniel Kao, will be joined by founders, investors and various industry professionals to chat about college to real world transition, career development, industry trends and startups. Visit our site (brighteyes-students.org) to learn more about the program and what’s next!

Give this podcast a listen, and feel free to contact me if you have any thoughts, questions, or comments!

Video

Audio

Show Notes and References

  • Tiffany’s background (2:09)
  • How Tiffany began exploring careers in college (3:30)
  • Tiffany’s trip to New York and how that impacted her career (5:18)
  • How do you reach out to professionals? (7:02)
  • How did BrightEyes get started? What were the challenges in the beginning? (8:56)
  • The two years of BrightEyes tours, and the difference between them (11:52)
  • Where BrightEyes is headed in the future (15:45)
  • Self-awareness and the power of knowing yourself (17:52)
  • Networking is about adding value and building a relationship (21:05)
  • What it’s like to be on the mentor side of the relationship, and why Tiffany does BrightEyes (23:35)
  • What is it like to be a female in a very male dominated industry? (25:30)
  • http://tiffanydstone.com/2013/11/13/the-modern-woman-standing-out/
  • What does success mean to you? (28:29)
  • What advice would you give your 10 year younger self? (31:10)
  • What daily routines are crucial to your life? (31:52)
  • Find out more about Tiffany @tiffanydstone, http://tiffanydstone.com/
  • Find out more about BrightEyes @brightEyes_news, brighteyes.mentorship@gmail.com http://brighteyes-students.org/

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Successful Entrepreneurs Don’t Take Risks

On 06, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In Entrepreneurship | By Daniel Kao

It’s generally believed for entrepreneurship to be a risky endeavor. After all, 9 out of 10 startups fail and are never heard from again.

I’d like to suggest the opposite.

Startups are risky, but successful entrepreneurs are not risk-tolerant, they’re risk-adverse. Startups have way too many moving parts and challenges for someone to simply take a risk and hope they get lucky. If you simply take risks, you’re bound to fail.

Successful entrepreneurs take the time to think about all the different moving parts, and know how to mitigate the risks.

The naive entrepreneur simply builds a product and launches it hoping that people will come to them and begin using their product. The successful entrepreneur, more often than not, already has done market research and knows exactly how many people will use his product before even launching it.

And when it comes to dealing with the unknown, they have an ability to calculate exactly what the risk is, and understand all the implications of the risks. Successful entrepreneurs might launch things as a test, but often already have plans for what to do in the likely case that their experiment fails.

It’s easy to think of successful entrepreneurs as people who just got lucky and made it, but it’s rarely the case that one swing knocks the ball out of the park.

If being an entrepreneur isn’t about taking risks, it leads to the conclusion that entrepreneurship can be learned and systematically achieved.

It boils down to an understanding of your product and of the market that you are in. If you truly love your product and have taken the time to get to know your customer and the space you are in, you’ll be able to quickly pinpoint your customer’s dreams, hopes, and aspirations.

So don’t just take a huge risk. Think it through, test it, but be unapologetically brave and don’t second guess yourself.

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What Productivity Has to do with a Neat Bed

On 15, Sep 2014 | 3 Comments | In Productivity | By Daniel Kao

The first thing that most people do after waking up in the morning is check their phone.

I do it too.

But after scrolling through the twittersphere and seeing yet another coffee consuming startup company raised another gazillion dollars in their series gamma, I make my bed.

I haven’t always made my bed. In fact, I only started making my bed within the last couple of months. And although it may seem like the most menial and pointless of tasks, (I mean you’re just going to mess it up again not too long later) it has strangely added a sense of structure to my life.

I’ve talked about habits on a couple different posts before, and what strikes me about making my bed is that it’s a ritual that follows another ritual every morning. (there are very few times where I forget to sleep)

That way, by the time I get up to start my day, I know that I have gotten at least one thing right. A neat bed means I can start and end my day in an organized way. No matter how good or bad my day was, it always feels good to crawl into a neatly folded bed at the end of the day.

In fact, so many things pertaining to life is just like making my bed, because most things in life can be broken down into simple routines that are executed over and over. With just a little effort, so many of the little things add up to make huge differences.

It’s the little things in life, that when done right, contribute to the bigger picture. It’s the small wins that make up the big wins. You can’t run a marathon without learning how to take the first steps, just like you can’t get a degree without going through the first day of school.

I’ve noticed that there are a few areas personally for me to regularly maintain to keep myself at my best condition.

  • Sleep
  • Food and Water
  • Exercise
  • Reading
  • Creative Expression
  • Friendships
  • Meditation

What are your most important rituals?

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